By Patrick Hanson

 

 

“My heart, its ugly but its real, the beauty of being authentic and real in a world of digital filters.” 

–    Patrick Hanson

 

All artwork by Patrick Hanson, Handsonworks.com. Most works are from his HUNG Series which will premier later this year.

 

 

My name is Patrick Hanson.

 

As an artist who feels my best days are still ahead of myself, I often vacillate in my own certain uncertainty. But I see that Tech/internet is killing so much of what we love, and I’ve had to change that aspect of my life because of that. I speak too quickly, move too fast, and forget to slow down to see the trajectory of my stellar ideas and my high expectations. I’m privileged to have many people in my life who have been anchors and supporters. They come from and have been inspired by what I feel are scores of lifetimes with amazing people.

 

I plan on releasing a series of works, show, and ideas some that are community-based, crowd-sourced, and funded. The idea is to set up a not for profit system that I work with that then it grows beyond me and becomes its own.

 

The works have been a lifetime in the making, and I’ve never been so sure of my craft than I am as I’m writing this sentence. My art has and is a summation of every aspect of my life and every single entity in it. I often forget to honestly or politely say thank you, because in my head and world I’ll say it many times. I’m the extreme of so much, I often worry people just put up with me – and well, at times I annoy myself, so I can only imagine.

 

It’s that aspect that drove me to look deeply inward and hone what is good and to make a little negative impact on the world as possible. Looking back at my career, I see my advice always seems clear and better for others than myself. I forget my value, my worth, my willingness to put myself first. Which has lead me to solve the problem by working on community-based projects, start taking on patrons, selling ideas, creating works that bring life and happiness to all involved.

 

One of my upcoming shows (DTBA) was my Senior project show for my BFA. It is a 5-room installation, and it was reviewed as visionary, groundbreaking, a peek into the future, and received a “Committee A”, which is a rare distinction to have a panel of art professors all agree and see the works for what it was: a peek into the vortex of my mind, body, and soul. The new series revisits and revives my lust for creating, creation, and manipulations of the views perspective in our current world. If the viewers walk away with an “I don’t get it,” that’s fine. The willingness to admit that is a signal of thought. The unasked question is relevant when there is an engagement with the works. I don’t always know what my work is about, all I can hope for is that the answers come to me.

 

Another one of my shows (TBA) will deal with how we label things, how our labels have defined us, and how inhumane we have become in the cult of personality. I often think of how the words liberal, gay, queer can become hateful and stolen because it threatens the powers that be. Art often challenges that system, and I guess I have as well.

 

Thanks for reading and consider helping out by going to Handsonworks.com. Interested patrons or sponsor can contact me at Info@handsonworks.com.

 

Show dates will be released on Handsonworks.com as well as ways you can join to help out.

 

 

 

ART in the ATL

By Patrick Hanson

 

I feel I’m an odd one to be asked to talk about The ATL art scene. I say that with a bit of candor, humility, and bewilderment. I mean I’m no official judge but I, as most of us, am a critic.  Both willing, knowingly and unwilling, unconsciously. 

 

But I will say that my steadfastness is most often rooted in the bedrock of a standard, base level, or average. I don’t like to speak or swim in the pool of hyperbole. I may dip into a pool of it by my ego or storytelling, but I have increasingly been challenging myself to rise above it, striving to be thoughtful in the way I digest information, critique, and share.  I’ve had a rebirth in the way I want to participate in the human experiment of art with a renewed focus of self.

 

That being said.

 

I’ve traveled in so many places all over the world, and my biggest complaint about ATL for the longest time was there was so little public art.  Cities like Chattanooga I felt was way ahead of us in supporting the arts.  I love to see the city is now embracing it with the city murals project to the street corners art. (Spinning Rock, Swallowed Car).

 

My hope is the city put more time and energy into such aspects because without it our cities will be stagnant.  People live in a city of the lifestyle and culture, and the arts brings all that and so much more. It brings us together so we can meet, discuss, contemplate, and hopefully enjoy.

 

Atlanta obviously is the biggest city in the south, and you would think as a default we are and always have been at the apex of what’s going on, and in many ways we are.

 

The art world is growing by leaps and bounds.

 

The Beltline has infused a whole new level of art and culture to our city that is giving people exposure to art culture that many are shy to partake in on there own.

 

The High Museum always offers remarkable shows, and with Infinity Mirrors being so wildly successful, there is a ripple if not wave of discussion on art.

 

Out Front Theatre Company is bringing queer voices, creators, and stories all under one roof with a focus on the queer community.

 

The Goat Farm artist community provides a space and an opportunity to grow and create for a slew of artists across the artistic spectrum.

 

If you are a little tentative to get out and see art, I’d strongly encourage people to do one or more of the art festivals.

 

Dog Wood, Piedmont Arts Fest, et cetera – a lot is going on, and it’s a great way to spend time with someone, a group, or some much needed alone time.  I would recommend taking a pair of headphones just to recess into your world.  Just take time to absorb the art without pretense.  Start with easy stuff like, do you like the color, is there tension in the work, does it evoke feeling.

 

Charity events and silent auctions like Joining Hearts, Jerusalem House, PALS, et cetera is another way to go to a fun event and possibly buy some great artwork. I encourage people to bid high and often for works in a silent auction, especially if it’s from a working artist.

 

My hope for ATL is that it continues to feature art, artist, and support the culture we bring; without it, we are living in a boring cookie cutter life.